Video Tutorials

The following are some basic ties that I use for self-suspension, showing how to self-tie a hip harness, chest harness, foot cuff, manage uplines, tie a hanger, and more. These videos are intended to supplement proper in-person instruction, never to replace it! I am not claiming to have invented these ties; most are based on ties that are so widely taught in the bondage community that I don't know how to credit them. Where I can, I have sited originators or who I learned from.

Self-bondage is dangerous, even potentially deadly. No form of bondage is ever without risk. Self-suspension is an aerial activity with many inherent dangers. There is always a chance of injury regardless of how experienced you are, safety measures you have in place, who is spotting you, or who your teacher(s) are. Never self-tie alone or without proper in-person instruction. This site is solely intended to provide suggestions for harm reduction. 

By choosing to engage in self-bondage, you take responsibility for your own well-being. Upon viewing these videos, you agree to hold harmless all persons and organizations involved in their creation. The creators and contributors will not be responsible for any damage or injury resulting from attempting or practicing any activities described or shown on this site. Viewing these videos constitutes agreement to this effect.

 

Simple single column tie

This is a larks head/half hitch combination, used to create a single column tie. Not the "one twue way" to do a single column tie (there are many others, like the Somerville Bowline, that are more useful and faster when you just want a column tie), but useful because these knots are the "building blocks" of all the harnesses I tie.. In this video I'm using 8mm (5/16") MFP from Venus Ropes.

 

Simplified Hip Harness

This is an absolutely simplified hip harness that I use for self-suspension. It is based on a "swiss seat" style hip harness, which I originally learned from this video by Topologist. This version minimizes hitches, which makes the harness quicker and simpler to tie and somewhat less bulky. If you find the tensions are slipping, you might want to try an alternative version shown below, that includes more hitches to lock off the tension. In this video I'm using 6mm hemp from Twisted Monk.

 

Simplified chest harness

This is an absolutely simplified version of the chest harness I use for self-suspension. It is based on classic Shinju chest harnesses, which are widely taught with numerous variations. This variation is intended to be loaded from the front or side. If you find that this isn't lying flat for you, or you'd like to experiment with a more involved version, see the modified version below!  In this video I'm using 6mm hemp from Twisted Monk.

 

Attaching a hanger

This is a method for attaching a hanger to the hip harness shown in the previous video.  In this video I'm using 6mm POSH from Twisted Monk.

 

Attaching support lines for self-suspension

Tips on managing support lines for self-suspension. Several of these techniques are inspired by/learned from Topologist – this article of his also discusses support lines. Get in-person instruction for self-suspension; this video is intended ONLY to supplement other safety and technical teaching. Always self-suspend with a qualified spotter.  In this video I'm using 6mm POSH from Twisted Monk.

 

Gravity Boot

This is a basic gravity boot tie that I use for self-suspension (and partnered suspension).  I learned a basic gravity boot years ago, and I'm afraid I can't recall who I learned it from, otherwise I would credit them here! I've since modified it to be faster to tie for performances. :-)

 

Back loading chest harness

This is a chest harness I use for self-suspension when I want to load the harness from the back. It is based on shinju chest harnesses, variations of which are which are quite widely taught in the bondage community. Keep in mind that loading from the back can be strenuous; the chest compression can cause difficulty breathing, and you can cause damage to your ribs, intercostal nerves/muscles, brachial plexus, etc. This video is intended only to supplement appropriate risk-aware in-person instruction.

 

Foot cuff

This is a basic foot cuff for suspension, intended to be used as a substitute for a single column tie around the ankle. This is not intended to be used alone but rather as non-critical support for a suspension. As opposed to a gravity boot, which is intended to load from the bottom (and which can be used for single-point suspension), this cuff is intended to load from the top. In this video I'm using 8mm (5/16") MFP from Venus Rope.

 

Hip Harness for Side Suspension

This video shows a hip harness variation for side suspension. It is based on a harness I learned from Topologist. It can be used for self or partnered suspension. In this video I'm using 6mm hemp rope from Twisted Monk.

 

Reinforcement for hip harness

If you have problems with your hip wrap slipping up, or just want to make the hip harness more comfortable, this variation might help.

 

Hip harness version 2

This is a somewhat more complicated version of the hip harness shown above. It adds more hitches, which could be useful to you if you find you are having difficulty maintaining tension in the first version.  In this video I'm using 6mm hemp from Twisted Monk.

 

Chest harness version 2

This is a somewhat more complicated version of the chest harness shown above that adds in some weaving and other variations. In this video I'm using 8mm (5/16") MFP from Venus Rope.